Africa

Safari in the Queen Elizabeth National Park

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We continue with the stories of trip to Uganda, this time after the Kampala's long road to the park, we started the Queen Elizabeth National Park safari.

Upon leaving the hotel we find this herd of elephants.

I remember those days that I had unusual awakenings. Two days before, in Kampala, I had put the moisturizer on my glasses, the day before I had put them in the shower with them and that morning I fell off the upper bunk to land loudly on the floor before the stupefied gaze of our roommates.

Impalas welcoming us to the park.

After such a painful awakening, we headed to the national park at half past six in the morning. During the night hours, at dawn and dusk it is when there is more activity in the park. And so, as soon as we hit the road, we saw a herd of elephants in the distance. That first meeting made us presage that we were going to see many animals that day.

He Queen Elizabeth National Park It has an extension of 1978 m2 and it is the second largest natural park in Uganda, behind of Murchison Falls.

The Common Warthog, aka Pumba

The most abundant species are buffaloes, antelopes and the common warthog (aka Pumba). For four hours, we explore the plains of Kasenyi accompanied by Jackson, a ranger of the UWA that was explaining curiosities about the wildlife of the park. He explained that at that time there were only 200 copies of the lion, so it was very difficult to see them, just like the leopards.

The crowned crane is the national symbol of Uganda

We continue on until we reach Lake George. On the shore there was a small population that lived on fishing. When we arrived, the fishermen were preparing their nets to go fishing for tilapia while a herd of about twenty hippos frolicked in the water quietly. Jackson explained to us that recently there had been an anthrax epidemic and, therefore, the number of copies of these huge animals had been reduced considerably.

Fishermen preparing the nets.

In Queen Elizabeth NP there are no giraffes, nor zebras (to see zebras we had to wait until trip to Botswana), but many birds can be seen in the northern sector. For example, we saw many crowned cranes, the bird that is the national symbol of Uganda and that appears on the flag of the country.

Hippos the sea of ​​fresquitos in the water

On our way back to the hotel, we ran into the elephant herd again, but this time, and to our amazement, they decided to cross the road just a few meters away from our van. Jackson explained that it is difficult to take a census of the elephants in the park because they do not stop moving between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whose border was located just 35 kilometers from our hotel.

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