Europe

The ruins of Segesta and Érice

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Sicily is located in the middle of the Mediterranean, at a strategic point between Europe and Africa, so it is not surprising that it was a candy for all ancient civilizations. They say that Teocles was shipwrecked on the beaches of Naxos about 735 BC. and he was so fascinated by the landscapes of the island that he did not stop until he convinced his people to mount a Greek colony there. They entered by the west and little by little they were done with the whole island, where they built temples, theaters, agoras, cities and walls, to the point that currently Sicily is the place that houses the largest number of best preserved ruins in the Hellenistic world. Many more than Greece, although it is hard to believe. Interestingly, part of the island was occupied by the Greeks as they cohabited as they could with some clueless Trojans.

TO one hour drive from Palermo are the Segesta ruins. It was Palm Sunday and it was not easy to leave Palermo behind with our newly rented Fiat 500. Half of Palermo's arteries were cut off to traffic, so this was crazy.

At the top of Mount Barbaro the ruins of Segesta rise. Being spring, a mantle of yellow, orange and red flowers welcomed us to the site. The city of Segesta was founded in the twelfth century BC, although its Doric temple is from the 5th century B.C. By boat soon, it seems that the temple is half destroyed by the passage of the centuries, but no, it turns out that they left it half built and that is why it has no roof (although I doubt that it would still be preserved if it had come to be). Another thing that denotes that it was not finished is that the columns do not have the characteristic stretch marks. Despite being an old city of Elima, it is believed that the elites ended up adding to the Hellenistic fashion.

Also, on top of a neighboring hill, is theater. There is a bus that runs almost two kilometers uphill for € 1.5, but we wanted to recreate past times and we walked up (although at some point I regretted it). The theater was built in the third century B.C., had a capacity for 3200 spectators and is one of the best preserved today. What makes it special in front of others are the panoramic views of the Sicilian green landscape that can be seen from the stands.

It was half past one and we decided to go to the city of Erice to eat and then take a walk in the afternoon. From the ruins of Segesta to Érice there are about 30 minutes by car, although the last section of the road consists of a good succession of curves and steep slopes, since, as a good medieval city, Érice is located on top of a mountain. If you do not have a car, you can also go up to Erice from the town of Trapani by funicular. Unfortunately, unlike other medieval Italian cities, Erice disappointed me a lot. The only highlight of the visit is the cuisine and the views.

Upon arrival, we leave the car in the parking lot in the trapani gate, which was free for being low season, and we went in search of a place to eat. It is a very tourist population and none of the menus of the day had just convinced us, so we ended up adopting the tactics of Elisabeth Gilbert (Eat Pray Love) and we asked a villager what was the best place to eat.

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