America

Excursion to the ruins of Tulum and the Great Cenote

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That was our last whole day in Tulum and, according to the forecasts, the day rose with clearings and clouds. On the agenda we had to visit the highlights Tulum: the Mayan ruins and some of the many cenote in the area. To get to the area of ​​the ruins from the "eco-chic" part of Tulum you can rent a bike or go by taxi. We opted for the taxi because if it rained, as it seemed it would happen later, I didn't feel like riding a bike.

Upon arriving at the entrance, we met a lot of people coming out of the ruins. The facilities at the entrance were new and very complete. There was a shop, official guides, bathrooms and lavapies. The Tulum ruins They were still inhabited when the Spaniards arrived in Mexico and, although architecturally they are not the most spectacular in the entire Mayan world, it is worth visiting them for their enclave, since they are located right on the beach.

The whole enclosure is very well preserved, but at first I had the feeling of being in Port Aventura and it seemed that he was going to find me the entrance of the Tutuki Splash over there in the middle. Maybe it was due to the garden areas and the multitude of paths that take you from one place to another. Or maybe it was because there were a lot of people, a lot of tourists; Too much for my liking (what are we going to do, one gets used to the good stuff).

One of the things that makes visiting these ruins special is being able to bathe in the small cove inside the enclosure and see the ruins from the turquoise water. It must be said that it is quite spectacular, although that day the sea was a bit choppy and there was a lot of waves. And at that precise moment, in the very Caribbean Sea, I realized three things:

1. I am a pool woman.
2. I can't stand the beaches of fine sand.
3. Without glasses I don't see a damn.

How sad to get to the Caribbean to realize that you don't like the beach, or at least THAT beach. Because yes, yes, it was very pretty. Postcard But the sand was so fine that when you entered the water, you got into all the recesses of the swimsuit and, even if you showered, the damned never came out. Above, to top it off, as the wind blew a lot, to which you came out of the water you became a walking croquette because the air dragged the fine sand and you ended up getting hooked throughout the body. It's this kind of thing that you can't imagine when you see the photos in the travel agency's catalog.

After leaving the ruins turned into croquettes, we decided to go to a cenote (natural pool) to take a bath and try to get rid of all that sticky sand. At the exit there were taxis waiting and, as we doubted between going to the Great Cenote or to Cenote Cristal, we ask the taxi driver for advice. The man told us that the Great Cenote had a changing room and that, being more touristy, he was better prepared. The truth is that the idea of ​​the locker room is what made us finish deciding and we asked him to take us there, making a stop on the way to get money from an ATM. The taxi driver took us to a BBVA office near a large Supermarket. In the cashier there was an American gentleman taking out money and, when he finished, he approached me to publicize the excellences of his restaurant. He gave me a card and he left very happy thinking that maybe he had won a new client, but he left so happy that when I went to get money from the cashier I saw that he had forgotten his credit card there. I went after him, but the man had vanished in a matter of seconds. So, giving an example of a model citizen, I entered the entity and handed over the card so that it did not fall into bad hands. My good action of the day.

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