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Excursion to Zinacantán and afternoon in San Cristóbal de las Casas

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Behind the visit to San Juan Chamula We returned to the van to continue with the second part. This time it was about visiting the municipality of Zinacantan and especially its main location: San Lorenzo de Zinacantán. Unlike San Juan Chamula, Manuel had great compliments for them. The Zinacatecans are also Tzoziles, but in Manuel's eyes they were more "civilized." When we arrived at the main square, the market was over and they were picking up. The Tzoziles of Zinacantán wear blouses embroidered with floral motifs and the municipality is dedicated to the cultivation of flowers in the dozens of greenhouses that are in the outskirts of the town.

When entering the church, what perhaps surprises is that it is a normal and ordinary church, with benches to pray and hear the mass, without pine leaves on the ground and totally untouched. What stood out most was the amount of fresh flowers that were on the altars.

Manuel explained to us that in Zinacantán they were more open and more educated, that the children were almost all schooled and that they were making a lot of progress. In fact, in Zinacantán we did not visit either the cemetery or the Jsotz 'levetik museum about local culture, but it took us to a typical tzozil house from Zinacantan. Manuel explained that they had gotten some families to let them that the little groups that went with them could visit their house and be allowed to take photos in exchange for some commission or what you wanted to buy them later (I'm not sure). Manuel showed us the typical room where they sleep and the typical kitchen where there was a woman making natural tortillas. Everyone said they were great, but I didn't venture to try them so as not to tempt my stomach luck, which by the way was being very good that morning. The truth is that the family was very friendly and did not break their chores during our intrusion.

At the end of the visit we returned to the van to return to San Cristobal while the sky turned black again. Since we arrived in San Cristobal, at noon the sky used to close and a storm fell and, just when we arrived at the Cathedral Square, the sky began to discharge water. We ran to take refuge on the porch of one of the buildings in the square and there we met Laura, who was reviewing her Spanish notes. She had two classes in an academy and she looked very happy. She was the day before on her own in San Juan Chamula and we were sharing experiences of the place. Then we said goodbye and went to look for a nearby place to eat something.

When we finished eating, luckily it had stopped raining and we went to visit San Cristóbal de las Casas. We start with the Andalusian November 20. It is a pedestrian street that has many restaurants and souvenir shops. We went to the park where the temple and former convent of Santo Domingo Guzmán. Although the church was closed, we could at least enjoy its excellent baroque facade, dating from the 17th century. In the square where the temple is there is a colorful market for outdoor crafts, where you can buy all kinds of crafts typical of the area at very affordable prices. In fact, to everyone who goes to Mexico and intends to visit Chiapas, I recommend that you stop shopping for San Cristóbal de las Casas.

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