Africa

Second day of Self Drive Safari in Etosha National Park, Namibia

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New account of 15-day trip to Namibia for free that we did in August 2016. That day we continue exploring Etosha in self-drive safari (i.e. driving ourselves) and we ended up spending the night in a Outjo hotel. Come on!

We get up early to dismantle the camp before going to Etosha. That night we had reserved a room in a hotel in Outjo, an hour's drive from Anderson's Gate. In the initial trip plan, that was where we were going to sleep when we returned from Epupa Falls. As we had already paid for it, we decided to use it to sleep in a bed, have a good shower to dust and sand Etosha and buy supplies for the next two days of camping.

At seven o'clock we were at Anderson's Gate and there was a long line of cars and vans to make entry permits to the park. I got out of the car and went to talk to the person at the checkpoint. I asked him if he would let us in through the exit lane. As we had the permits paid for that day, he let us through without problems.

We made the first stop at the pond of Ombika, which is very close to the entrance. There we discovered a herd of zebras drinking water, with some foals that were already a little grown up.

Later we returned to the main road towards Okukajenjo and there we saw a giraffe. I love this animal. There were two more on the other side of the road, but they were far away. Later we went to the gas station to get the tires ready for the track road, but it didn't work, so we just filled the tank. That day we wanted to explore the west side of the park in the direction of Dolomites camp.

In that area there were various artificial ponds and we wanted to see if we had more luck than the day before. When going on a safari, one has to be prepared to drive for a while without seeing any animals. You cannot leave the marked track, so you don't see anything if they are not right next to the road.

What abounds most in Etosha are the springboks, there are everywhere. Xavi explains to me that in German bock means goat and that spring skip. And is that one of the characteristics of springboks They are the jumps that hit. From time to time you see a specimen on the road giving boats as if it were in pogo-stick.

The difference with the path of the previous day is that the distances between the ponds are very long and there are almost no cars, no groups, so the feeling of loneliness is extreme. An hour from Okaukuejo we arrive at the picnic area near Sprokieswoud and we decided to stop to go to the toilet. That service area was completely fenced and to access you had to get out of the car to open the fence. Any predator in sight? No, so he had to go down, open the fence and close it once the car entered. Etosha's picnic areas consist of masonry tables and chairs and the toilet in a toilet bowl connected to a deep hole.

We continue the march towards the pond of Ozonjuitji m'Bari and as we got closer we saw more and more animals: herds of springboks, orix, wildebeest and zebras and when we arrived: ding, ding, ding! Jackpot! The pond was overflowing with animals. Among them seven giraffes, which are very funny drinking because they have to be dewormed to get to the water. There were also two huge elephants and numerous zebras, ostriches, antelopes and a group of wildebeest a little angry. We were there for a while alone, in front of the show. A little later another car arrived, but nobody else.

We decided to try another artificial pond to see if we were lucky and we saw some predator. We drive to the pond of Sonderkop. The road became a bit long because it took almost half an hour to arrive. And again, to which we were approaching the pond we began to find a lot of animals.

The pond was overflowing with animals, but there were no predators. What can we do! Even so, the show was beautiful and there we were alone again. We spent some time watching the pilgrimage of animals to drink. You watched them approach, they drank and soon they left.

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