Africa

Visit to the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia

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We continue with the stories of 15 days trip to Namibia that we did for free in August 2016. On this occasion we left the Etosha National Park in the direction of Windhoek. Along the way, we stopped at Cheetah Conservation Fund, a foundation that works for prevent the extinction of cheetahs in Namibia

We got up at 6 am, picked up the tent, had a quick breakfast and went to do the check out at the hotel reception that opens at 6:30. At 6:45 we were already on B1 in the direction of Windhoek where we were going to spend the night. From Etosha to the capital there are about five hours without stops, but our intention that day was to make a stop at the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

At 9:30 we arrive at Otjiwarongo, we stop fifteen minutes to go to the service and take the D2440 road towards the Cheetah Conservation Fund. The track road was in quite good condition and it took us 44 kilometers in about 50 minutes at a speed of 60 km / h.

The Foundation for the conservation of cheetahs or Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) is a non-profit organization that Julie Marker launched in 1990 in Namibia to promote programs that facilitate good coexistence between farmers and cheetahs. Since 1900, the number of cheetahs has been reduced by 90% and they have become extinct in 25 of the 45 countries where they originally lived. This has been mainly due to the loss of their habitat, their prey and the reprisals of farmers when they see their livestock threatened. The center was located in Namibia because this country is home to the largest number of cheetahs in the world. Here several tourist activities are made to generate income, but above all it is a research, education and conservation center.

We did the Cheetah Drive by the CCF and a very friendly guide gave us a safari car ride for an hour while giving us a good explanation about the problems of cheetah survival. We could also see four of the 39 copies They have there in large plots. These get there very small. They are usually donated by farmers who find puppies near their farms after killing the mothers. Logically, we try to reintroduce all possible ones back into nature, although for various reasons there are some that can no longer be retrofitted and also keep them in the CCF.

Both readaptables and those who do not receive periodic care in the veterinary clinic of the foundation. In addition, the guide took us to see the dogs They breed there. These dogs from Anatolia brought them as part of a program that consists of selling them to farmers to protect their herds. And, for now, these farmers have managed to reduce the loss of livestock by 80% due to predators. In addition, the foundation investigates the cheetah's habitat and monitors the genetics of its population. On the other hand, they also provide training to farmers and have programs with various universities.

All these efforts are bearing fruit little by little, since the population of cheetahs in Namibia has almost doubled in the last twenty-four years to reach about 3500 today. You can get more information and collaborate on the foundation's website: www.cheetah.org

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