Asia

Travel to Japan: What to visit in Kyoto (and we will not do)

Pin
Send
Share
Send


I suppose you will have noticed that in the tickets I make few specific references about what we will visit, and that is what we reserve for when we write the travel diary. What we were talking about the other day is what we would not visit in Kyoto. Not because it is not worth going, but as I have already gone, we prefer to take advantage to see new things.

Omamori (stamped version of the virgin amulets) sold in temples. These are those of the Kinkaku-ji.

One of the temples that we will not go to, but which is highly recommended, is the Golden Pavilion (Kinkaku-ji). The Kinkaku-ji has this name because it is coated with gold leaf. The most impressive thing is that it is in the middle of a pond and its golden silhouette is reflected in the water. This is one of the most typical photos of Kyoto. I remember that when we went there were dozens of Japanese taking pictures with their mobile and it was a bit difficult to make a site.

Golden Temple or Kinkaku-ji

Another prominent place in Kyoto is the Ginkaku-ji, or the silver pavilion. Although this one is not covered with silver because the Shogun Yoshimasa, who was the one who had it built in 1482, ran out of budget. The Ginkaku-ji is surrounded by bamboo forests and there is a lot of peace in it.

The temple of La Plata or Ginkaku-ji

Nijo Castle, although more than a castle it looks like a palace. It is a fortress of 1603 that was the residence of Shogun Ieyasu Tokugawa. It is a castle that is on one floor and is surrounded by gardens. The highlight is the wooden floor that squeaks when you walk, not that it is old, but it was designed to warn the presence of people and possibly of adversaries. Personally I found it a bit boring because the interior is empty of furniture and objects of everyday life, although there is a room in which it is represented with mannequins as it was an official reception.

Nijo Castle

He Fushimi Inari It is 5 minutes by train from Kyoto (Inari stop JR Nara line, 140 ¥). The curious thing about this temple is that merchants ask for the prosperity of their businesses by putting a "Tori" (door) with the name of their company taxed on it. There are so many aligned that there are about 4 kilometers. The visit can take you 2 hours, but we only endured 15 minutes walking, because seeing the cobweb pieces that were between door and door gave me enough yu-yu. It is also worth going, walking around and writing a fox-shaped tablet making a wish.

Pin
Send
Share
Send